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THOMAS A. EBERHARD

A native of Pennsylvania, was born June 9, 1845, a son of Daniel and Christina (Robinson) Eberhard, the former living, the latter deceased. Caroline Snider became his companion on life's journey October 29, 1876, in Bronson, Mich. She was born in Wayne county, N.Y., Aug. 6, 1843, a daughter of George W. and Rachel (Northern) Baker, long ago numbered with the dead. Comrade Eberhard was engaged on the part of the Union in the late Civil strife. He had been engaged in farming and was 18 years of age when he was enrolled Jan. 20 , 1864, as a private in Co. G, 9th Mich. V.I. December, 1864, he was detailed to guard prisoners for seven months. He took active part in the Atlanta Campaign and was honorably discharged at Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 15, 1865. He had two brothers in service, Robert and William, the latter being wounded in right arm; his wife's brother George served in 111th N.Y.I. Comrade Eberhard is a member of Hackett Post; his occupation is that of a farmer and his address is Bronson, Mich.

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WILLIAM D. EDDY

Was born in Washtenaw county, Mich., Feb. 16, 1828, and was a son of Jasper and Polly (Eddy) Eddy, deceased. He was married July 4, 1848, to Eliza J. Eddy, who was a daughter of Eli and Lydia Eddy, deceased, and was born July 3, 1823. The children of this union are Marvin F., dec., William W., Ella J., Merriet and Jesse, dec. He was again married September, 1863, to Almary Layman, who passed to her reward Sept. 20, 1882, leaving two children, Minnie and Jessie A. Comrade Eddy was engaged in farming when the war began. He enlisted August, 1864, when 35 years of age as a private in Co. E, 13th Mich. V.I., and went through the entire service with the regiment, which has an enviable record. He was treated in camp for piles and rheumatism for seven days. He took part in the battle of Bentonville and several skirmishes and was granted his honorable discharge June, 1865, at Washington, D.C. His brother Jasper was in Co. E, 13th Mich. V.I., and died in service. Comrade Eddy's postoffice address is Three Rivers, Mich., near which place he is engaged in farming.

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JOSEPH P. FARRAND

Was born in Almira, N.Y., May 10, 1833, and was a son of Charles and Nancy (Christian) Farrand, deceased. He was married Oct. 11, 1857, Bronson, Mich., to Olive C. Smith, who was born in Noble, Mich., Jan. 2, 1841; her parents, numbered with the dead, are Thos. and Parmelia (Sweet) Smith. One child was born to them, Willie. Comrade Farrand served in the Federal army through the Civil war and was 27 years old when he was enrolled Sept. 1, 1862, at Burr Oak, Mich., in Co. D, 11th Mich. V.I., 14th A.C. In 1863 he was confined in hospital at Louisville, Ky., four months, suffering with typhoid fever. Sept. 17, 1862, he was captured at Mumfordsville, Ky., but was immediately released on parole. February, 1863, he was detailed on guard duty four months. He fought at Mumfordsville and was honorably discharged Sept. 6, 1865, at Detroit, Mich. His brother James served in the late war and was wounded at 1st Bull Run in ankle; his wife's brother Luther was also in service. Mrs. Farrand took an equal active interest in the late war and was a nurse in hospital at Louisville, Ky., ten months, and eleven months at Jeffersonville, Ind. Comrade Farrand is a member of Sturgess Post, and his address is Bronson, Mich.

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MILO FREEMAN

Was born in Lapeer county, Mich., Jan. 10, 1841, and was a son of Amon and Sophia (Kelsey) Freeman. He was married first Dec. 25, 1865, in Constantine, Mich., to Catherine VanGilder, who was born in New York state April 9, 1850. She was a daughter of Barnabas and Hannah (Parker) VanGilder, the former only is living. His wife passed away Jan. 26, 1889, leaving five children, born in the following order: Mary Jane, Sophia, Charles A., dec., Barney A., dec., and Grace G. He was married secondly March 8, 1891, to Elizabeth Martin, who was born May 30, 1837, in Erie county, Pa. She was previously married to Wm. Miller, who died in 1858, leaving one child, Charlotte, who is now deceased. Comrade Freeman was in Texas when the war broke out. He left home the spring of 1858 with a married sister, moving to Missouri, staying there two years, then got a chance to go to Texas with some families that were moving there, and having a desire to see the country went, not thinking that we were on the eve of a five years' war. But there was a regiment recruited called the 3d Texas Cav. Rangers, not knowing what to do and not wishing to enlist, it was useless to try to get home. The colonel of the regiment, who was one of his former employers, offered him good wages to drive his wagon, and as they were going northeast towards his home he concluded to improve the opportunity and get pay at the same time. He was at the battle of Wilson Creek, where Gen. Lewis was killed; he stayed with the regiment until some time in December, when they went into winter quarters, and he had to either enlist or leave. He then made his way down into Arkansas and stayed till some time in April, 1862, when he was forced into the 19th Arkansas (Reb.). This regiment was sent through the state with orders to take all over the age of 18 and under 50 years, and if they wouldn't go hang them to a limb--it was a rope or gun. He served in that capacity about ten months and finally finished up at Arkansas Post, on the Arkansas river, under Gen. Price. General Grant sent some of his troops up there before going to Vicksburg and took them in, and then our subject was sent to Camp Douglas, Chicago. As soon as he got there he began to look around for a chance to go home, which was in Lagrange county, Ind.; he was informed that he could get out if he would take the oath of allegiance, which, of course, he was willing to do, and he arrived home the last of February, 1863. Having a desire to go back and pay Uncle Sam the debt he owed him and to help defend the flag he loved. In answer to Pres. Lincoln's call for three hundred thousand troops that summer, he enrolled his name and donned the blue; he was assigned to Co. C, 128th Ind. V.I., 1st Brig., 1st Div., 23d A.C.; he enlisted Oct. 24, 1863, and was discharged May 16, 1865, on account of gunshot wound received in action. He served in Sherman's army and took part in the following engagements: Buzzard Roost, Resacca, Rome City, Dallas, Kenesaw Mt., Chattahoochie River, Peach Tree Creek and Siege of Atlanta; He was then sent back with Gen. Thomas to meet Gen. Hood in Tenn., and was at Marietta and the battle of Franklin, where he was wounded; he was sent to hospital at Nashville, and sixteen days later was transferred to Jeffersonville, Ind., and from there sent to Washington as a convalescent. He saw A. Lincoln after he was shot, and received his honorable discharge May 16, 1865. His oldest brother, S.K. Freeman, served nearly five years in 44th Ind. Vols.; another brother, Lewis, was in the Regular army fifteen years. His first wife's father served in the late war and his present wife's maternal grandfather fought in the Revolutionary war. Comrade Freeman is a member of Elmer Post, No. 36; he is a laborer and his address is Constantine, Mich.

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LEWIS FRY

Was born Jan. 3, 1841, in Schuylkill, Pa., of parents Jacob and Catherine (Bossman) Fry, deceased. He was married in Madison, Mich., June 24, 1866, to Ella Piper, and their hearthstone has been graced with two children, Clara, dec., and Clarence. His wife was born in McHenry county, Ill., April 27, 1851, a daughter of Abel Piper, deceased, and Lydia A. (Moore), still living. Comrade Fry offered his services to his country and was enrolled June, 1861, as a private in Co. K, 7th Mich. V.I., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 2d A.C. June, 1864 he was struck on leg with spent ball at Spring Run. December 1861 he was treated in hospital near Washington two weeks with severe cold. Aug. 25, 1864, he was captured at Reams Station and was held in Libby prison four days, Belle Isle one month and Salisbury five months. In the summer of 1862 he was detailed as cook for officers and spent six months in this way. He was honorably discharged December, 1864, to re-enlist as a veteran in old command and was given the usual furlough. He fought at Ball's Bluff, Yorktown, Williamsport, West Point, Fair Oaks, Peach Orchard, Savage Station, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Mine Run, Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains and Reams Station. He was finally honorably discharged June 24, 1865, at Camp Chase, O. He had two brothers in service, Malvin and Samuel, the latter was confined in Andersonville eleven months; His wife's step-father served in the late war. Comrade Fry belongs to the G.A.R., and his wife to W. R.C., his address is Three Rivers, Mich.

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DOC GRAY

Son of Johathan and Elizabeth (Swift) Gray, neither of whom are living, was born in Grayson county, Va., July 1, 1837. He has been twice married, his first union being July 4, 1867, in Coldwater, Mich., with Mary F. Hart, who was born in New York state Aug. 12, 1842, and passed to her reward Dec. 22, 1869. He was married secondly at Cedar Springs, Mich., April 3, 1871, to Mary A. Hart, who was born in Pittsfield, Mass., Jan. 4, 1837. Two children were born to them, May A. and Frances E. His first wife was born of parents, Noah and Mary (Carr) Hart, also deceased. Comrade Gray was employed as a cooper when the late war began. Sept. 1, 1863, at Burr Oak, Mich., he enlisted in Co. B, 7th Mich. V.I., 2d Brig., 2d Div., 2d A.C., and served in the ranks of Uncle Sam until the close of that memorable conflict. Nov. 29, 1863, he was wounded in right thigh at the battle of Mine Run; he was taken to hospital at Fairfax, Va., where he was treated four months. In the spring of 1865 he was confined in hospital at Detroit, Mich., three months with chronic digestion of stomach. June, 1864, he was confined in hospital at Davids Island two months, suffering with chronic trouble. November, 1864, he was given a thirty day furlough to vote. May, 1864, he was detailed to duty on hospital boats. June, 1865, he was detailed as ward master at Harper's hospital, Detroit, Mich., two months. With this gallant regiment he faced the enemy in many famous battles: Mine Run, Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Ny River and Cold Harbor. Upon the close of the war he was honorably discharged July 5, 1865, at Detroit, Mich. His brother Nathaniel served in an Ohio Regt., and his wife's brothers, Irbine in the 11th Mich. V.I., and Benj. F. as Lieut. of Co. D, 11th Mich. V.I. Comrade Gray is a member of David Oaks Post, No. 171; he is a newspaper correspondent and his address is Nottawa, Mich.

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LEONARD C. GREEN

Was born in Ohio Dec. 3, 1840, and was a son of John and Hannah (Ellis) Green, deceased. He was married May, 1867, in Sturgess, Mich., to Fannie Dolph, who was born in New York state; her father, Jacob Dolph, is still living, but her mother, Eliza (Lape), is deceased. Four children have been born to them, Viola, George, Carlton and Guy. Comrade Green was 19 years of age and had been engaged in farming when he deceded to take up arms in defense of his country. H was enrolled from Burr Oak, Mich., Aug. 22, 1861, as a private in Co. K, 7th Mich. V.I., 3d Brig., 3d Div., 2d A.C. In 1864 he was confined in hospital at Washington, D.C. four weeks with lung fever. He took part in the battles of Ball Bluff, Yorktown, West Point, Savage Station, Fair Oaks, Peach Orchard, Savage Station, Harrison's Landing, Malvern Hill, Fair Oaks, White Oak Swamp, Glendale, Malvern Hill, South Mt., Peninsular Campaign, 2d Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Falling Waters and many others not mentioned. He was honorably discharged Aug. 22, 1864, at Washington, D.C. He had two brothers in service, John and James, the latter was taken prisoner twice and was confined in Andersonville and Libby prisons. Comrade Green is engaged in farming and his postoffice address is Sturgis, Mich.

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MILTON GREENWOOD

Son of Ethan A. and Jane (Hannay) Greenwood, deceased, was born in Michigan, April 14, 1844. He was married Dec. 24, 1872, in Jackson, Mich., to Emma Toumey, who was born in New York City March 6, 1852. Her parents, Steven and Frances (Martin) Toumey, still survive. Their only child, Millie, married Harry Bechtel, whose father was a veteran in the Mexican war. Comrade Greenwood was 19 years of age and had been engaged in farming when the late war began. he was enrolled December, 1863, at Leonidas, Mich., as a private in Co. A, 11th Mich. V.I., 2d Brig., 3d div., 14th A.C., and before the close of the war he was made Corp. July 4, 1864, he lost the use of his hearing at Rough Station by shell bursting near him, the shell having killed one man and shot an arm off another in its course; he was confined in hospital at Chattanooga two months, suffering with chronic diarrhea. He was detailed to guard military prison at Chattanooga for six months and was also detailed to guard railroad. He participated in the battles of Buzzard Roost, Resacca, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mt., Savage Station, Ringgold and Atlanta, and was honorably discharged September, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn. His father served in the Black Hawk war and his grandfather was a member of the Revolutionary war. His wife's father belonged to 12th N.Y.V.I. and was taken prisoner; her maternal grandfather served in the war of 1812 and her great-grandfather served in the Revolutionary war. Comrade Greenwood has been deputy sheriff for two years; he is by trade a carpenter and his postoffice address is three Rivers, Mich.

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ANTHONY B. GRIFFIN

Was born in New York City April 20, 1821, and was a son of Joseph and Rebecca (Matthews) Griffin, deceased. He has been married two times, his first union being Oct. 16, 1860, in Boonsboro, Ia., with Sarah Crouse, who was born in Indiana March 9, 1841, and passed to her reward Feb. 20, 1881. Six children were the issue of this marriage, Thomas B., George, dec., Charles, dec., Anna, Mattie and William. He was married secondly May, 8, 1882, to Anna S. Smith, who was born Feb.8, 1857, at Three Rivers, Mich., a daughter of Abel and Martha (Doty) Smith. One child was the issue of this union, Daisey B. Comrade Griffin was enlisted in Ia. State Militia, called Northern Border Brigade, on the frontier for twenty-two months prior to his enlistment. At the age of 38 years, like many other boys of this counry, he responded to the president's call for troops to put down the Rebellion; he was enrolled March 30, 1864, as a private in Co. I, and L, 7th Ia. Cav. August, 1864, he was wounded at Stone Hill in arm and left thigh, for which he was treated in field hospital. In May, 1864, he was detailed as asst. surgeon at Sioux City till February, 1865, when he was detailed as asst. Q.M. until granted an honorable discharge May 16, 1865, at Sioux City, Ia. He took part in the battle of White Stone Hill. Comrade Griffin has been very prominent in affairs of his county; he has served with fidelity and honor, as sheriff two terms and deputy U.S. marshal; marshal of Sioux City; was deputy county treasurer and deputy U.S. marshal of Dakota; he is honored with the office of P.P.C. in G.A.R. Post, No. 72, and his address is Three Rivers, Mich.

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NOAH D. HAGERMAN

Was born in Seneca county, N.Y., Aug. 1, 1829, and was a son of John and Fannie (Nichols) Hagerman, deceased. He was married in Florence, Mich., Aug. 20, 1850, in Florence, Mich., to Rebecca Williams, who was born January, 1831, and passed to her reward in 1874. Her parents are both deceased. One child was the issue of this union, Lelia. He was married secondly Feb. 22, 1875, in Fabius, Mich., to Hattie Biddle, who died June, 1884. He married thirdly June 17, 1889, Martha M. Justice, who was born Aug. 17, 1836, in Wayne county, Ohio. Comrade Hagerman underwent the hardships and privations of a soldier's life when the Nation was in peril. He was enrolled Aug. 8, 1862, as a private in Co. A, 19th Mich. V.I., 2d Brig., 3d. Div., 20th A.C., and soon rose to the rank of Sgt. May 15, 1864, he was wounded in right hand at Resacca, and again May 19, at Cassville, in cheek, and at Culps Farm through left thigh; in the fall of 1862 he was confined in hospital at Cynthiana six weeks, suffering with chronic diarrhea. In the spring of 1865 he was sent to hospital at McDougal, N.Y., where he remained until honorably discharged May 29, 1865. When able, he was detailed as nurse in Cynthiana one month and later as hospital steward till March 3; he then went to Lexington, Ky., as nurse and then at Camp Dennison till Nov. 1, 1863. The following are his battles: Nashville, Chattanooga, Resacca, Cassville, New Hope Chgurch, Galgotha, Culps Farm, Peach Tree Creek, Siege of Atlanta, Savannah, Averysboro and Bentonville. His paternal grandfather served in the Revolutionary war; his wife's brother Samuel was a member of the Ohio Regt. Comrade Hagerman is a G.A.R. member and is P.C.; he is a carpenter by trade and his address is Three Rivers, Mich.

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JAMES L. HAINES

Son of Chester and Cornelia (Ackley) Haines, the former living, aged 73 years, the latter deceased, was born in Seneca county, N.Y., Aug. 16, 1844. The maiden name of his wife, to whom he was married in Three Rivers, Mich., Sept. 14, 1885, was Laura A. Stickney. She was born in Newburg, Mich., Dec. 22, 1859; her father, Sidney Stickney, is deceased, but her mother, Frances (Gardner), is still spared, aged 64 years. Two children were born to them, Isaac and George. Comrade Haines gave his young manhood to his country's needs and joined the standard Aug. 24, 1861, at Three Rivers, Mich. when 17 years of age as a private in Co. E, 11th Mich. V.I., 2d Brig., 2d Div., 14th A.C. In the spring of 1862 he was confined in hospital at Shepardsville three weeks, suffering with typhus fever. In July, 1864, he was confined in hospitals at Marietta and Kinston one month with chronic diarrhea. In the summer of 1862 he was detailed to drive team at Div. Hd. Qtrs. at Columbia, Tenn., two months. He was honorably discharged Sept. 30, 1864, at Sturgis, Mich. and re-enlisted at Three Rivers, Feb. 13, 1865, in Co. F, new 11th Mich. V.I., as Corp. In the spring of 1865 he was detailed as train guard from Chattanooga to Knoxville. He faced the enemy at Ft. Riley, Stone River, Elk River, Davis Cross Roads, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Graysville, Bussard roost, Resacca, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mt. and Savage Station. He was honorably discharged Sept. 16, 1865, at Jackson, Mich. His paternal grandfather served in the Revolutionary war and war of 1812, and his maternal grandfather fought in the war of the Revolution. His wife's father was member of 25th Mich. V.I. and died in service; her grandfathers served in the war of 1812, and her great-grandfathers fought in the Revolutionary war. Comrade Haines has been constable; he is a mason and his address is Three Rivers, Mich.

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JOHN W. HALL

Was born in Ontario, Canada, Aug. 12, 1833, and was a son of John and Mary (Barton) Hall, deceased. He was married to Mary A. Sanderson, who was born in Centerville, Oct. 15, 1862. She was born there Dec. 1, 1847, and was a daughter of John and Orpha (Logan) Sanderson, long ago deceased. Their family consists of two children, Isaac and Kittie, the latter being an adopted child. When treason trailed our flag in the dust, our subject was enrolled Aug. 25, 1861, when 24 years of age; he entered the ranks of Co. A, 11th Mich. V.I. In 1862 he was confined in hospital at Columbia, Tenn., two months, suffering with typhoid fever. In 1861 he was given a leave of absence of two days and reported for duty at end of time. He was detailed at Bargetown, Ky., to guard bridge four weeks. He also took part in considerable scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty, and was honorably discharged July 3, 1862, at Nashville, Tenn. His brother Henry was also in service. Comrade Hall has been deputy sheriff four years, constable twenty-one years; he is a member of Little Post, No. 131, and his wife belongs to W.R.C.; he is a liveryman and his address is Colon, Mich.

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A very special "Thank you" to LeAnn K. Clark for her generous contribution of this material

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