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CYRUS ALLEN

Was born in Lorain, Ohio, Aug. 2, 1848, and was a son of John Allen, still living, and Eshter (Fenn), deceased. He united his fortunes for life with Susan G. Bennett at Batavia, Mich., Sept. 4, 1872. She was born Oct. 24, 1848, of parents, James K. and Susan Bennett, deceased. Two children were adopted by them, Jessie and Francis. Comrade Allen was a member of Co. D, 166th O.V .I. and has an honorable war record. He was but 15 years of age when he was enrolled from Medina, Ohio, as a private May 10, 1864. In the summer of 1864 he was confined in hospital at Fairfax Seminary one month with fever. September, 1864, he was honorably discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, and re-enlisted February, 1865, at Warren, O., in 2d Ol Cav. In the spring of 1865 he was detailed in Ordinance Dept. He did not take part in any regular battles as his services consisted of garrisoning forts. He was honorably discharged Sept. 18, 1865, at Columbus, Ohio. His brother Edward served in an Ohio Regt. Comrade Allen is a farmer by occupation and his postoffice address is Mattison, Mich.

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JAMES P. ALLEN

Was born in Green county, N.,Y., Aug. 13, 1844, and was a son of Jarvis and Mary (Chandler) Allen, deceased. The lady whom he chose for a helpmate through life was Hanna Chapman, the nuptial knot being tied June 17, 1868, in Mattison, Mich. She was born in Litchfield, Mich., Nov. 13, 1850. Her parents, both living, are Amos and Jane (Van Fleet) Allen. Four children have been born to them, Minnie, J.D., Francis and Nellie. Being a loyal and true patriot of this country, he enlisted when 18 years of age, September, 1862, at Mt. Clemmons, Mich., as a private in Co. B, 8th Mich. Cav., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 9th A.C. in 1863-4 he was confined in hospitals at Camp Nelson, Louisville and Detroit one year suffering with measles. He was granted a leave of absence of fourteen days and returned to hospital at the end of time. He was transferred at Pulaski, Tenn., to Co. L, 8th Mich. Cav. In 1862 he was detailed as Q.M. at Nashville for three months. He took part in several prominent battles, Triplett's Bridge, Morgan's Raid, Seige of Knoxville, Dandridge, Mossy Creek, Strawberry Plains, Sevierville and several others. He was honorably discharged Sept. 22, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn. He had two brothers in service, Albert and George, the latter being taken prisoner three times; his wife's brother Lester was also in service. Comrade Allen has been school inspector five years and school director three years; he belongs to Butterworth Post, No. 109; he is a farmer by occupation and his address is Bronson, Mich.

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JAMES H. ARMSTRONG

Was born in Coldwater, Mich., April 19, 1847, and was a son of Stephen and Melvina (Edmunds) Armstrong, deceased. He was married Oct. 3, 1885, in this county, to Bertha Johnson, who was a native of Michigan, born Oct. 15, 1868; her father, David Johnson, is still living, but her mother, Jane (Wood) is deceased. Three children have been born to them, Frederick, Blanche and Josephine A. Comrade Armstrong was 19 years of age when he began preparation for active participation in the late war. He was enrolled from Coldwater, Mich., Aug. 30, 1863, as a private in Co. A, 9th Mich. Cav., 6th Brig., 9th Div., 4th A. C. In 1865 he was furloughed for thirty days and reported for duty at end of time. Dec. 16, 1864, he was captured at Belle Island and was held in Libby prison four months, when he was exchanged. In the fall of 1864 he was detailed as guard for three months at Richmond. He took part in the battles of Cumberland Gap, Richmond and Charleston, and was honorably discharged May 1, 1856, at Washington, D.C. His brother Lorain was in service and was held in Libby prison; his wife's father also served in the war. Comrade Armstrong is a laborer and his postoffice address is Burr Oak, Mich.

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JAMES AVERY

A native of England, was born Sept. 11, 1830, and coming to the United States in 1849, settled in St. Joseph county Mich., in 1854. His parents, no longer living, were Thomas and Caroline (Wilson) Avery. His wife, whom he married June 7, 1867, in Fabers, Mich., was Sarah A. Salter. She was also a native of England, born April 11, 1843. Her parents, deceased, were John and Mary A. (Luce) Salter. Nine children were the issue of this marriage: John W., Alfred E., Henry E., Samuel N., George S., Mary A., William C., Thomas H. and Herbert R. When the war cloud settled over our country and treason trailed our flag in the dust, like thousands of other boys, he responded to the president's call, being enrolled August, 1864, at Three Rivers, Mich., when 34 years of age. He became a private in Co. E, 13th Mich. V.I., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 14th A.C. and several others, receiving an honorable discharge June 21, 1865, at Detroit, Mich. His wife had three brothers in action, Silas in Mich. Cav., James, in Co. G, 13th Mich. V.I., was taken prisoner, and George, who was taken sick soon after entering the service and died; her father was a member of Co. E, 11th Mich. V.I. Comrade Avery is a member of Prutzman Z Post; he is a retired farmer and his address is Three Rivers, Mich.

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SAMUEL BAIRD

Was born in Baltimore, Md., June 15, 1841, and was a son of George W. and Eliza (Merrell) Baird, deceased. His helpmate on life's journey was Clara Town, the nuptial knot being tied Jan. 1, 1866, in Bedford, Mich. She was a native of Ohio, where she was born Feb. 23, 1846. Three children were born to them, Minnie, Gertrude, dec., and Daisey, dec. At the age of 19 years, like many other boys of this country, he responded to the president's call for troops to put down the Rebellion. He was engaged in farming when he was enrolled Aug. 26, 1861, as a private in Co. H. Merill's Lt. Horse Cav. July 4, 1864, he was furloughed for sixty days and returned to duty at end of time. He was on special service from 1861 to 1865, except the three months spent in Arkansas under Gen. Davis. He was granted his honorable discharge Sept. 19, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn. He had two brothers in service, Matthew, who was taken prisoner and confined in Andersonville six months, and Robert, who was sick and sent home where he died. Our subject has a pension, and his address is Delton, Mich.

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LAFAYETTE BARTON

Was born in Sherwood, Mich., Sept. 27, 1844, and was a son of Robert and Maria (Waugh) Barton, deceased. He was united in marriage March 23, 1870 in Union City, Mich., to Anna E. Cline. She was a daughter of Ephraim and Mary (Sheeks) Cline, deceased, and was born in Sherwood, Mich., Oct. 4, 1847. Of this union were born three children, Charles, Chauncey and Fannie F. Comrade Barton served a short time in the Union army during the late unpleasantness. He was enrolled from Sherwood, Mich., Feb. 20, 1865, as a private in Co. B, 11th Mich. V.I. In 1865 he was detailed at Sweetwater, Tenn., as guard for about six weeks. Owing to this duty and the lateness of his enlistment, he was not called into active service, and was granted an honorable discharge Sept. 20, 1865. His brother Charles served in the late war. Comrade Barton has been school director six years and pathmaster two years; he is a member of Corbin Post, No. 88; his occupation is that of a farmer and his address is Sherwood, Mich.

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MARSHALL BELLINGER

Was born in Barry township, Mich., Aug. 4, 1845, and was a son of Frederick and Almira (Butterfield) Bellinger, deceased. He was married Feb. 8, 1869, in Bedford, Mich., to Frances Dewey, who was born in Calhoun county, Mich., Feb. 13, 1846; her father, Levi Dewey, is still living, but her mother, Mary (Ramsdall), is deceased. Of this union were born three children, Winifred, Ruth and Reed, deceased. Comrade Bellinger was a farmer of 17 years when the late war began. He was enrolled Sept. 15, 1862, at Battle Creek, Mich., as a private in Co. A, 7th Mich. Cav., 1st Brig., 1st Div., 1st A.C., and was soon made Sergt. In the winter of 1864-5 he was granted a leave of abscence to return to Michigan recruiting and was on detached service at Jackson, Mich., until the spring of 1865, when he rejoined his regiment at Washington. He took part in some of the most hotly contested battles of the war: Culpepper C.H., Racoon Ford, White Ford, Jack's Shop, James City Cross Roads, Brandy Station, Bucklin Mills, Stevensburg, Morton's Ford, Richmond, Wilderness, Beaver Dam Station, Yellow Tavern, Meadow Bridge, Milford, Hawe's Shop, Baltimore Cross Road, Cold Harbor, Travillian Station, Petersburg, Winchester, Front Royal, Leetown, Shephardstown, Smithfield, Berryville, Oppequan, Winchester, Leroy, Pt. Rebublic, Mt. Crawford, Woodstock, Cedar Creek and several others, receiving his honorable discharge D3ec. 15, 1865, at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan. Comrade Bellinger has been township clerk one year; he is Com. of John Stark Post, No. 249; his occupation is that of a farmer and his postoffice address is Banfield, Mich.

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ISAAC BLOSSER

Was born in Perry county, Ohio, Nov. 22, 1836, and was a son of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Halbord) Blosser, deceased. The lady whom he chose for a helpmate through life was Emily O'Hare, and they were married in the fall of 1865, in Hocking county, Ohio. She was born in that county of parents, Hewett and Margaret (Kepler) O'Hare, deceased. Four children were born to them, Frank, Ida, dec., Charles, dec., and Clayton, dec. Comrade Blosser is a veteran of the late war and served his country as a private in Co. G, 114th O. V.I. at the age of 25 years. He had been engaged in farming when he enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, at Perry county, O. In 1863 he was detailed at Milligan's Bend as ambulance driver for eighteen months. He also took active part in the battles of Chickasaw Bluff, Arkansas Post, Thompson's Hill, Champion Hill, Black River Bridge, Vicksburg and Ft. Blakely. He was honorably discharged July 31, 1865, at Columbus O. His wife had two brothers in service, Martin and John W. Comrade Blosser is a farmer by occupation and his address is Bronson, Mich.

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WILLIAM M. BOUGHTON

Was born in Orange county, N.Y., Sept. 12, 1838, and was a son of James and Mary (Mahaffey) Boughton, deceased. On Dec. 20, 1869, he was married in Nottawa, Mich., to Sarah J. Hill, and their hearthstone has been graced with two children, Fred F. and Lew L. His wife was born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, Jan. 16, 1849. She was a daughter of Daniel and Hulda (Town) Hill, deceased. When the war broke out he was engaged in farming. He responded to the president's call for brave boys to don the blue in defense of the Stars and Stripes and was enrolled Aug. 20, 1861, at Coldwater, Mich., when 23 years of age as a private--was later made Sergt.--of Co. B, 44th Ill. V.I., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 15th A.C. July, 1862, he was confined in hospital at Corinth, later at Lagrange six weeks, suffering with chronic diarrhea; he was previously confined in camp hospital for bilious fever and measles. July, 1862, he was detailed as nurse at Lagrange for six weeks. July 9, 1864, he was detailed as receiving steward in hospital at Marietta, Ga., six months. August, 1865, he was detailed at Pt. Lawrence, Texas, to help unload boats for one month. He was honorably discharged Jan. 1, 1864, re-enlisting in old command as a veteran and was given the usual furlough. He was actively engaged in the battles of Pea Ridge, Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Dandridge, Hoover's Gap, Rocky Face Ridge, Resacca, Adairsville, Kenesaw Mt., Peach Tree Creek, Siege of Atlanta, Spring Hill, Franklin, Siege of Corinth, Shiloh and several others. He was honorably discharged Sept. 25, 1865, at Camp Ervin, Texas. He enlisted in April, 1861, but the Regt. disbanded two weeks later. His brother John was a member of 8th Mich. Cav., and was starved to death in Andersonville prison; his paternal grandfather served in the Revolutionary war seven years; his wife's half-brothers, Ellehor, George and Horace Rice, all served in the war; Frank was wounded and died in service; her maternal grandfather served also in the Revolutionary war. Comrade Boughton is P.P.C. of Little Post, No. 131, and his wife belongs to W.R.C.; he is a farmer by occupation and his address is Wasepi, Mich.

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CHARLES G. BRIGGS

The subject of this brief sketch was born in Onondaga county, N.Y., Oct. 2, 1819; his parents, no longer living, were Thomas and Lemira (Seely) Briggs. In 1861 he was united in marriage to Ann Luce. Comrade Briggs underwent the hardships and privations of a soldier's life when the country was in peril and was a brave and true defender of his country. He was 43 years of age when he was enrolled Nov. 25, 1862, as a private in Co. D, 1st Mich. S.S., and was one of the best soldiers of his regiment. In July, 1863, he was confined in hospital at Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa., two months, suffering with chronic diarrhea. In 1865 he was detailed at Jerusalem Plank Road, Va., as home guard. Not until the war ended did he return home, taking part in the battles of the Wilderness, North Anna River, Spottsylvania, Petersburg, Hatcher's Run and several others, receiving an honorable discharge Aug. 11, 1865, at Detroit, Mich. His grandfather served in the Revolutionary war; his wife's brother James was a soldier in a Mich. Regt. Comrade Briggs is a pensioner and he resides near Delton, Mich.

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JOHN BRUMEY

A native of England, was born May 8, 1829, and coming to America settled in Barry county, Mich., in 1865. His parents, no longer living, were Philip and Ann (Miller) Brumey. His wife was born June 6, 1830, in England, and their marriage was consummated March 6, 1853. She was Mary, daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Bailey) Tungate, long ago numbered with the dead. Their domestic ties have been graced with five children, James, dec., Laphrona, Fred, Nettie and Hattie. Comrade Brumey offered his services to this country's needs Aug. 24, 1862, and was enrolled when 31 years of age as a private in Co. A, 9th N.Y.H.A. He was furloughed in the fall of 1863 for thirty days and returned to duty at end of time. He took active part in all the engagements of his command and was granted his honorable discharge Dec. 3, 1863, at Ft. Simmons, D.C. His wife had four brothers who served their country in the hour of peril: Benj. died from injury received in service, William, John was taken prisoner, and Edwin, who was wounded in face. Comrade Brumey is a laborer and his address is Hickory Corners, Mich.

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JOHN R. BYRD

Was born in Southampton county, Va., April 29, 1832, and was a son of Jared and Clora Matilda Byrd, deceased. He was married Aug. 25, 1855, in Bellefountaine, Ohio, to Mary M. Moxley, who passed to her reward December, 1866. The three children of this union, Giles P., Massack Y. and Hopeful T., are deceased. He was married secondly March 12, 1868, to Mary E. Preston, who was born in Warren county, Va., March 15, 1842. Comrade Bryd enlisted to defend the flag of his counry. He was enrolled February, 1865, at Bellefontaine, Ohio, in 5th U.S.C.H.A. In August, 1865, he was stricken with rheumatism and bone fever, for which he was treated in Vicksburg hospital about two months. Owing to the lateness of his enlistment and the close of hostilities so soon thereafter, he was not called into active serice, and was honorable discharged February, 1866, in Vicksburg, Miss. His brother James served in 54th Mass. V.I., and was wounded at Ft. Pillow with fragment of shell; his maternal grandfather was a cousin to Pres. Jackson and a slave holder. Comrade Byrd is a member of Joss Post, and his postoffice address is Constantine, Mich.

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#13 LYMAN CARPENTER

Was born in Steuben county, N.Y., May 25, 1838, and was a son of Wm. and Mary (Perkins) Carpenter, deceased. He was married Nov. 7, 1867, to Julia A. Hull, who was born in Huron county, O., Nov. 8, 1848; her father, Ira Hull, is living, but her mother, Hester (Jump), is deceased. When Pres. Lincoln issued a call for troops to defend the Nation's cause, his patriotic love for freedom actuated him to enlist and he was enrolled Oct. 30, 1861, as a private at White Pigeon, Mich., in Co. D, 1st Mich. Art., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th A.C. Sept. 20, 1863, he was wounded at Chicamauga, and was confined in hospital two months suffering with smallpox. He took part in the Siege of Corinth, the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Chicamauga, Lookout Mt., Missionary Ridge and others equally important. He was honorably discharged Nov. 11, 1864, at Nashville, Tenn. His brother William was in the late service. Comrade Carpenter has been pathmaster three years; he is Com. of Hackett Post; his occupation is that of a farmer and his address is Bronson, Mich.

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A very special "Thank you" to LeAnn K. Clark for her generous contribution of this material

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